December 06, 2019

Young Architect Award Presented to Associate Fátima Olivieri-Martinez

Associate Fátima Olivieri-Martinez was presented with the 2019 Young Architect Award from AIA Philadelphia last night. Each year, the award recognizes a registered architect between the ages of 25 and 39 for remarkable contributions in leadership, practice, and service.  
 
Originally from Puerto Rico, Fátima credits time spent in different regions of the US with sparking her interest in the built environment—and its cultural and climatic context. She pursued this interest at the University of Puerto Rico School of Architecture and the University of Virginia before coming to KieranTimberlake in 2011.  
 
In her near decade of work at KieranTimberlake, she has been involved with projects including the award-winning renovation of the historic Dunster House at Harvard University. More recently, she has managed design and construction for the major public spaces and a 350-seat proscenium theater in a large mixed-use building for New York University. She has also been influential as a mentor to new hires at the firm and as an educator at Temple University and elsewhere. 
 
In 2013, she helped formalize KTCI, our Community Involvement group that offers pro bono design services in line with our commitment to dedicating 1% of our time to community service and engagement. Fátima has led an initiative to develop a simulated environment on planet Mars for STEM education in high schools; collaborated with Philabundance to address food insecurity; and co-led a design charrette focused on reactivating vacant schools in Philadelphia. She also spearheaded a collaboration to create a graduate-level design studio focused on designing a visionary school in Puerto Rico as part of efforts to build resiliency following the devastation of Hurricane Maria.  
 
Fátima is the first KieranTimberlake associate to be recognized with the Young Architect Award, and we are proud of her contributions to our work and to the field of architecture. Congratulations, Fátima!